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AP Classes: Quality Over Quantity

The+Advanced+Placement+Program+from+College+Board+is+an+educational+opportunity+for+high+school+students+to+participate+in+college-level+work.++Reynolds+has+a+variety+of+AP+classes+available+such+as%3A+AP+World+History%2C+AP+U.S.+History%2C+and+AP+Environmental+Science.+
The Advanced Placement Program from College Board is an educational opportunity for high school students to participate in college-level work.  Reynolds has a variety of AP classes available such as: AP World History, AP U.S. History, and AP Environmental Science.

The Advanced Placement Program from College Board is an educational opportunity for high school students to participate in college-level work. Reynolds has a variety of AP classes available such as: AP World History, AP U.S. History, and AP Environmental Science.

The Advanced Placement Program from College Board is an educational opportunity for high school students to participate in college-level work. Reynolds has a variety of AP classes available such as: AP World History, AP U.S. History, and AP Environmental Science.

Isaac Cooper, Managing Editor

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    “Take an AP class in a discipline that you are passionate about.  Take an AP class in a discipline that you think might be amazing. [Do not] take an AP class because you need a higher GPA.”

    Joshua Present, an AP Language & Composition teacher at the Career Center, emphasizes his desire for qualitative assessment of AP classes.  Regarding the state of AP scores in college admissions, Present addresses an element in that discussion: quality versus quantity of courses taken.

    It is recommended by PrepScholar that students should take the following number of classes for each type of college, a quantitative approach to the admissions process:

 

  • Less Selective Schools: 1-5
  • Selective Schools: 4-8
  • Very Selective Schools: 7-12

 

    The trend is apparent: the more selective a school is, the more AP classes one should take.  More AP classes offer the a college’s Department of Admissions more data to assess rigor of study and offer a glimpse into the academic potential of an applicee.  In short: to weed out the applications.

    However, what does it mean when very selective schools refuse to give credit for work done in an AP class setting?  Harvard University (acceptance rate: 6%, 2015) and Dartmouth College (acceptance rate: 11%, 2015) are two such schools who have lead the way in distancing themselves from AP. Dartmouth College has expressed that the reason behind their move was to encourage their education to happen wholly at the college.  

    “They [colleges] should take the credit because it’s a college level class,” sophomore Mary Catharyn Wolfert said.

    “It’s a lot more work that we are putting in, considering that it [AP classes] is a college level course, and if they’re not taking that into consideration… the amount of effort we are putting in to take that class…” sophomore Lynn Kluttz said.

    Another concern about AP classes is how well they prepare the student for college level education.  As students scored an average of 2.83 out of 5 on AP exams in 2013, their scores are considered to be almost “qualified” by College Board standards for their respective classes.  In other words, the scores reflect an inadequate preparedness for college in that subject.

    When it comes to AP classes: take what you are interested in, and enjoy the opportunity to explore a topic interesting to you.

 

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AP Classes: Quality Over Quantity